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This is why I won’t be buying the new Intel 10-Core i9 Processors

This is why I won’t be buying the new Intel 10-Core i9 Processors

When I spend my hard earned money on either a fully assembled computer system or on individual parts that I either use to assemble or upgrade a current computer there are a number of factors that go into my decision making process. And one of those factors is not processor speed nor is it the amount of cores and threads in the processor itself. As many of now a days computer processor chipsets are in the 10+ core and 3+ GHz range. Which could easily handle anything short of being used as a mainframe supercomputer. Some of the factors that help in me determining which computer processor to buy include either getting an average par processor with an average number of cores and threads and then balancing that out with a high amount of DDR4 system memory.

So for instance, an Intel i3 or i5 processor with four to ten cores coupled with at least 128+ GB of DDR4 system memory. Or I go the alternate route and purchase a processor such as AMD’s Ryzen Threadripper with 16 cores and still getting at least 128+ GB of DDR4 system memory due to the fact that I can get the Ryzen for the same amount of money or even cheaper than the i5, i7, and i9 processors. Why would I want to settle for a 4 or 10 core processor when I can get a 16 core processor for cheaper? Just because a newly hyped up processor is the latest doesn’t mean it’s the greatest.

Now if we are talking solely about the amount of threads and cores available for the average consumer, then Intel’s even newer i9 18 core extreme edition processor has caught the attention of my tech eye. Then again at roughly $2,000 I would much rather choose AMD’s $1,000 16 core Ryzen Threadripper. Saving $1,000 for a processor with two less cores sounds better than ever. And with that $1,000 saved I can use it to double my system memory, purchase a better cooling system, heatsinks, liquid cooling, more DDR4 RAM, etc… The amount of cores in a processor is not what makes a processor top of the line. As far as I’m concerned it is the combination of purchasing price, amount of cores and threads, amount of coupled system memory, and processor speed…and AMD’s $1,000 16 core Ryzen Threadripper solves that dilemma beautifully.